denisforkas:

Gabriel (The Dream of Annunciation I), 2013
Acrylics and shell gold on paper mounted on masonite, 73 x 31 cm

denisforkas:

Gabriel (The Dream of Annunciation I), 2013

Acrylics and shell gold on paper mounted on masonite, 73 x 31 cm

(via lupevision)

comicbookwomen:

Esteban Maroto

comicbookwomen:

Esteban Maroto

(via todf)


Get buried in this, get found by archeologists ten thousand years later, get presumed some kind of monarch or holy figure.

Get buried in this, get found by archeologists ten thousand years later, get presumed some kind of monarch or holy figure.

(Source: wrath-fire-ice, via ellenkushner)

erikkwakkel:

Happy owl

Some images just hit the right spot. This cute owl in his best red coat is part of a decorated page in a Pontifical, a book that was read during a special Mass in the church, often by the bishop himself. Having ploughed through a full page of big chunky letters, he was treated to a change of pace: a bit of entertainment in the lower margin. Hidden inside the colourful display sits the owl, who is looking, puzzled, at a bell. While the significance of the scene is lost on me, it made my day. Having been locked out of my Tumblr account for three days (see my previous post), it is good to be able to show you entertaining medieval things like this again. Thank you Tumblr Support Team!

Pic: Aarau, Aargauer Kantonsbibliothek, MS MurF 3 (dated 1508). The full manuscript can be browsed here.

(via 50watts)

strandbooks:

Old photos often fall out of the used books we receive, but rarely are they actually taped into the book.

This vaguely upsetting, georgeous photograph perfectly matches the tone of this haunting (and haunted) book.

You should absolutely read this book… but please be careful with it.

Underlined passage, The Book of Disquiet by Fernando Pessoa, page 64.

laclefdescoeurs:


Ornamental Lake in the Park, 1905, Yuli Yulievich Klever

laclefdescoeurs:

Ornamental Lake in the Park, 1905, Yuli Yulievich Klever

(via beautifulcentury)

whoisrogerwaters:

Do you guys remember that one time when Roger Waters held a gun up to Robert Plant

whoisrogerwaters:

Do you guys remember that one time when Roger Waters held a gun up to Robert Plant

(via imagine-robertplant)

"Those who find ugly meanings in beautiful things are corrupt without being charming. This is a fault. Those who find beautiful meanings in beautiful things are the cultivated. For those there is hope."

— Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray (via inmemoriaeexamoris)

(via fuckyeahoscarwilde)

providenzia:

Henry de Malvost -  Casting Spells of Love and Hate 

providenzia:

Henry de Malvost -  Casting Spells of Love and Hate 

(via venusmilk)

writersnoonereads:

No one reads “the sandwich-man of the Beyond.” 

Joseph Péladan was born in Lyons, in 1858, into a milieu obsessed with occultism…In 1884 Péladan imposed himself on the Parisian public by publishing Le Vice Supreme, a fantastic mystico-erotic novel in which poetry alternates with a no less studied prose: ‘Faithful to your monstrous vice, O daughter of da Vinci, corrupting Muse of the aesthetics of evil, your smile may fade from the canvas, but it is engraved for ever in my heart.’
Péladan, who changed his name from Joseph to Joséphin, described himself as ‘the sandwich-man of the Beyond,’ exhumed a mystical society founded in Germany in the late Middle Ages, declared himself its leader, and crowned himself Sar Merodac, a title which enabled him to dress himself up in a costume reminiscent of Lohengrin and Nebuchadnezzar. He was a dark, handsome man, with bushy hair and a bushy beard, ready to swallow — and utter — all sorts of nonsense. In the despairing Paris of his day, which he convinced of its decadence, Barbey d’Aurevilly sang his praises, and young men such as Jean Lorrain and d’Annunzio copied him… Péladan obtained immediate fame, drawing on two sources from which all those who were disgusted with materialism would drink: occultism and aestheticism. His books came out in rapid succession, under the general title La Decadence Latine.

The text comes from Dreamers of Decadence by Philippe Jullian and the post idea and image from Strange Flowers. There’s also a blog (in English) devoted to Péladan. I think I would prefer reading a biography — especially if it was titled “The Sandwich-Man of the Beyond” — rather than any of the 19 volumes of La Decadence Latine (never translated into English as far as I know).
@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook
update: illustrator Mahendra Singh says: “Joseph Péladan plays an occult role in Jean Christophe Valat’s Luminous Chaos (Melville House), the 2nd volume of his mind-bending, psychotropically overheated steampunk trilogy, Mysteries of New Venice. When I illustrated Sâr Péladan, I soon discovered the true meaning of ‘occult hair.’” Here it is!:

writersnoonereads:

No one reads “the sandwich-man of the Beyond.” 

Joseph Péladan was born in Lyons, in 1858, into a milieu obsessed with occultism…In 1884 Péladan imposed himself on the Parisian public by publishing Le Vice Supreme, a fantastic mystico-erotic novel in which poetry alternates with a no less studied prose: ‘Faithful to your monstrous vice, O daughter of da Vinci, corrupting Muse of the aesthetics of evil, your smile may fade from the canvas, but it is engraved for ever in my heart.’

Péladan, who changed his name from Joseph to Joséphin, described himself as ‘the sandwich-man of the Beyond,’ exhumed a mystical society founded in Germany in the late Middle Ages, declared himself its leader, and crowned himself Sar Merodac, a title which enabled him to dress himself up in a costume reminiscent of Lohengrin and Nebuchadnezzar. He was a dark, handsome man, with bushy hair and a bushy beard, ready to swallow — and utter — all sorts of nonsense. In the despairing Paris of his day, which he convinced of its decadence, Barbey d’Aurevilly sang his praises, and young men such as Jean Lorrain and d’Annunzio copied him… Péladan obtained immediate fame, drawing on two sources from which all those who were disgusted with materialism would drink: occultism and aestheticism. His books came out in rapid succession, under the general title La Decadence Latine.

The text comes from Dreamers of Decadence by Philippe Jullian and the post idea and image from Strange Flowers. There’s also a blog (in English) devoted to Péladan. I think I would prefer reading a biography — especially if it was titled “The Sandwich-Man of the Beyond” — rather than any of the 19 volumes of La Decadence Latine (never translated into English as far as I know).

@WritersNoOneRds / Facebook

update: illustrator Mahendra Singh says: “Joseph Péladan plays an occult role in Jean Christophe Valat’s Luminous Chaos (Melville House), the 2nd volume of his mind-bending, psychotropically overheated steampunk trilogy, Mysteries of New Venice. When I illustrated Sâr Péladan, I soon discovered the true meaning of ‘occult hair.’” Here it is!:

drakontomalloi:

Gustave Moreau - Salome and the Panther. 1880

drakontomalloi:

Gustave Moreau - Salome and the Panther. 1880

(via lupevision)

fuckyeahvintageillustration:

'La caution / The Deposit' by Anatole France; decorative lettering and illustrations by Léon Lebègue. Published 1912 by F. Ferroud, Paris.

See the complete book here.

versailleslife:

Spring (Apple Blossoms) by John Everett Millais. Liverpool, Lady Lever Art Gallery.

versailleslife:

Spring (Apple Blossoms) by John Everett Millais.
Liverpool, Lady Lever Art Gallery.

(Source: arboreas, via aesthete)

russian-style:

Alexander Benois - Costume design for “Le Pavillon d’Armide” - the revolutionary ballet by Michael Fokine and Nikolay Tcherepnin, 1907
Principal dancers were Vaslav Nijinsky and Anna Pavlova. This ballet heralded a new era of Balletes Russes.

russian-style:

Alexander Benois - Costume design for “Le Pavillon d’Armide” - the revolutionary ballet by Michael Fokine and Nikolay Tcherepnin, 1907

Principal dancers were Vaslav Nijinsky and Anna Pavlova. This ballet heralded a new era of Balletes Russes.

"

A silver Lucifer
serves
cocaine in cornucopia

To some somnambulists
of adolescent thighs
draped
in satirical draperies

Peris in livery
prepare
Lethe
for posthumous parvenues

Delirious Avenues
lit
with the chandelier souls
of infusoria
from Pharoah’s tombstones

lead
to mercurial doomsdays
Odious oasis
in furrowed phosphorous

the eye-white sky-light
white-light district
of lunar lusts

Stellectric signs
“Wing shows on Starway”
“Zodiac carrousel”

Cyclones
of ecstatic dust
and ashes whirl
crusaders
from hallucinatory citadels
of shattered glass
into evacuate craters

A flock of dreams
browse on Necropolis

From the shores
of oval oceans
in the oxidized Orient

Onyx-eyed Odalisques
and ornithologists
observe
the flight
of Eros obsolete

And “Immortality”
mildews …
in the museums of the moon

“Nocturnal cyclops”
“Crystal concubine”

Pocked with personification
the fossil virgin of the skies
waxes and wanes

"

Mina Loy, “Lunar Baedeker.”  (via mirroir)

(Source: literarymiscellany, via lupevision)

Tags: Mina Loy